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YouTube is switching up how it delivers community strikes to creators

YouTube is switching up how it delivers community strikes to creators

YouTube has announced that it is changing the way they notify users when issuing copyright strikes and warnings to channels.

The community guidelines are the universal rules across the platform that every creator has to abide by. Strikes are given to channels that violate the rules. 

Generally, the size of the channel or the popularity of the creator doesn't matter, everybody needs to follow the rules. Despite this, the changes going into effect will have an impact on everybody.

Creators will now get a warning, a reminder of the guidelines, and information on why their video may have violated the rules. 

This is different from receiving a first strike under the old rules from before. Channels can appeal a warning to get removed, but it will disappear after 90 days and return the channel into good standing. All other strike penalties are the same after this.

All of these changes will start going into effect on February 25, 2019. This is the first time that YouTube has made changes to the strike system since 2010.

  • 1st Strike: One-week temporary freeze on uploading content to YouTube
  • 2nd Strike: Two-week temporary freeze on uploading content to YouTube
  • 3rd Strike: If the account receives 3 Community Guidelines Strikes within a three-month period, the channel will be deleted by YouTube

According to YouTube, the first two strikes that a channel receives will remain in effect for two months. All of these rule changes are being implemented in order to make the feedback system and appeal system easier for creators to deal with, according to YouTube themselves.

“We know that most people don't mean to break the rules, so we're giving you a chance to understand what went wrong before you face more severe consequences, YouTube stated in a blog post.

"We understand that users make mistakes and don't intend to violate our policies - that's why strikes don't last forever.”


Staff Writer

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